Recommended Music

Recommended pieces of music

The links below will take you to recommended pieces of music that can be played during colouring activities, or set as the YouTube Class or Homework activity. You must have a link to the Internet to play these pieces and clicking on a link will redirect you to YouTube. To set them as a homework, you will have to send the URL (www.example.com) of each YouTube link home to parents or guardians. Alternatively the exercise can be done in class in a group or set individually. They are pieces played by instruments learned in class and are listed in alphabetical order. The title of each piece is above the video and the answers for the activity sheets are below each video link on this page. If there are children who would like a challenging piece, the word (Hard) will be written next to the title of the music. In these pieces, there may be many different moods throughout the piece, or the number of instruments may be harder to count, or the tempo may change. A child attempting a challenging piece can mark answers on the back of their activity sheet in a format advised by their teacher. A hard piece can also be worked on in a big group; the teacher can ask questions about tempo, number of instruments, mood and colour of instruments, and children can call out answers. Make sure to ask the children why they have chosen their answers and what the music reminds them of and makes them feel e.g. going on holiday, falling over, being extremely happy. NB: if you would like more recommended music, please contact the SymbolSmash team via email (found in the support section)

Cello

Chopin Sonata for Cello and Piano, Op.65

Colours: Brown

No. of Cellos: 1

Tempo: Fast

Mood: Angry, Sad, Worried

 

Mendelssohn – Song without words Op.109

Colours: Brown

No. of Cellos: 1

Tempo: Slow

Mood: Calm, Sad, Thoughtful

 

Flute

Chopin Nocturne Op.9 No.2

Colours: Silver

No. of Flutes: 1

Tempo: Slow (with a fast ending)

Mood: Calm, Dreamy, Happy (Angry when the music turns fast at the end)

 

Bach – Sonata in A Minor (HARD)

Colours: Silver

No. of Flutes: 1

Tempo: Fast (After 5 minutes the piece becomes slow. At the 9 minute mark the piece is fast again)

Mood: Bouncy, Sad, Surprised (the piece alternates between Happy and Sad often but remains Bouncy and Surprised until the piece changes tempo after 5 minutes and then becomes Calm, Sad and Thoughtful. When the tempo changes again at 9 minutes, the piece becomes Bouncy, Sad, Surprised and Worried. A few minutes later, the Sad changes to Happy and then back to Sad)

 

French Horn

Beethoven Sonata No.17 Allegro Moderato

Colours: Gold

No. of French Horns: 1

Tempo: Fast 

Mood: Dreamy, Excited, Happy (later on in the music, there is a section where it turns Sad and then becomes Happy again.)

 

Mozart Concerto #1 in D

Colours: Gold

No. of French Horns: 1

Tempo: Fast

Mood: Bouncy, Excited, Happy, 

 

Oboe

Albrecht Mayer et Helene Grimaud Op. 94

Colours: Black & Silver

No. of Oboes: 1

Tempo: Slow

Mood: Dreamy, Thoughtful, Sad

 

Mozart Oboe Concerto – Allegro Aperto Orchestra

Colours: Black & Silver

No. of Oboes: 1 solo (there are two others in the Orchestra, so the answer of 3 is acceptable)

Tempo: Fast

Mood: Bouncy, Excited, Happy

 

Violin

Schubert – Serenade

 

Colours: Brown

No. of Violins: 1 (there are others shown in the orchestra but they are not being played)

Tempo: Slow

Mood: Dreamy, Sad, Thoughtful

 

Vivaldi – The Four Seasons Spring (HARD)

Colours: Brown

No. of Violins: 1 solo, a quartet on the right (4) and 7 on the left (An answer of 10+ is acceptable)

Tempo: Fast (in the middle of the piece, the music turns slower and then becomes faster, and then slower, then faster again. The music will continue to alternate in this fashion and the child will have to mark how many times)

Mood: Bouncy, Excited, Happy, Surprised (there is a section where the music turns Sad and Worried before repeating the first set of emotions. The music changes again later on and becomes Sad, Thoughtful. It changes once again after this to Dreamy, Happy and Surprised, then back to Sad and Thoughtful, then Bouncy and Happy. The music will continue to alternate in this fashion and the child will have to mark how many times)

Lesson 9 – Lesson Resources

The aim of lesson 9 is to learn about the ‘P’ or Piano sign (pronounced p-yar-no) and it’s significance in the music. In music, Piano is the opposite of Forte and so this is a great opportunity to teach children about the concept of opposites. In the music, Piano means to play quietly/softly. In Voyage to the Moon, the sign is introduced to the children as Penelope Piano, a quiet and timid character who is Frederick Forte’s best friend.

Instead of telling the children outright what the sign is, the lesson begins with a quick exercise where you can probe the children into figuring out the meaning of the ‘P’ – opposite of loud, is quiet. You can also encourage them to point out other opposites including Penelope is a girl, Frederick is a boy, ‘F’ is tall, ‘P’ is short etc. While you introduce ‘P’, have the children demonstrate the definition by playing an untuned instrument softly, or performing a quiet action with their hands and voices. Later on in the lesson you can ask them to do this for both ‘P’ and ‘F’ in turn and test the children on their listening and concentration skills.

The activities in this lesson are quite similar to those from the Forte lesson. They give the opportunity for children to become imaginative, speak and build on confidence. They are encouraged to express their opinions of the way quiet music makes them feel and what they believe is the mood of the music in certain places e.g. happy, sad, dreamy, thoughtful etc.

The activity sheet in this lesson has children working together in pairs. This is a great opportunity for the teacher to pair up a quiet pupil with a loud pupil as each child has their own role and must fulfil them equally. After they have completed the sheet, the teams are encouraged to come up to the front of class and describe one picture on their sheet and why they believe it is either quiet or loud, ‘P’ or ‘F’ – this allows the children a chance to build on their confidence and speaking skills and demonstrate their understanding of the lesson.

Lesson 9 – Assessment & Homework

Homework for lesson 9 can be found at the bottom of this page

Assessment:

1) Questioning     2) Crescendo Skills Ladder      3) Musical Terms       4) Story     5) Self-Assessment

1) Questioning:

Become familiar with the different types of questions that can be asked throughout lesson 9. Questions for each heading increase in level of difficulty.

Take note of answering abilities of pupils to log in the assessment tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the questioning:

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2) Crescendo Skills Ladder:

Become familiar with the different criteria of skills that are to be assessed. Level 1 is the lowest, level 5 being the highest.

Take note during the lessons of pupil development to insert into their development tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Crescendo Ladder:

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3) Musical Terms: Assessment:

Become familiar with the ‘Musical Terms’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of musical terms. The pupils must connect the word to the corresponding picture.

TIP: Act out the pictures as a class. Point to the pictures in turn and ascribe actions to them. Some students may recognise the pictures (e.g. a crescendo), but may have English as a second language, therefore not yet able to link the picture to the word.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Musical Terms Assessment sheet:

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4) Story: Assessment

Become familiar with the ‘Story’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of the story. The pupils must write the word above the corresponding picture.

TIP: Read the poem with the class first: say the word ‘soft’ very softly, and make a ‘p’ with your fingers each time you say ‘p’.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Story Assessment sheet:

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5) Self-Assessment [optional]:

This is an OPTIONAL assessment sheet. Self-assessment should start as early as possible once pupils have settled into the school year, and at the discretion of the teacher. 

Print a copy for each member of the class. Pupils should indicate the level (between 1-5) that they believe they are at for each category.

Teachers will want to collect these in once completed – and file away.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Self-Assessment sheet:

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Homework

Print a copy of the homework sheet for each pupil. Pupils are to connect the pictures/words on the left side of the page, to the opposite word in the middle, and to the corresponding picture on the right side of the page.

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Lesson Content

OPEN SLIDESHOW

There are 9 exercises to complete during Lesson 9.

  • Before the lesson:
    • Scroll down the page to view information about each exercise
    • Ensure you have read through the preparation guide to this lesson
  • During the lesson:
    • Press ‘open slideshow’ in the top right corner of the page to display and play lesson resources to the class.
    • Download & print the lesson content information at the bottom of this page to reference during class

Lesson Content + Exercise Information:

1. Discussion: Opposites:
    1. Show the class the discussion picture – this is a series of words in two columns. The words in column 1 each have an antonym/opposite word in column.
    2. Ask for a volunteer to read a word in column 1. Then read through the words in column 2 together slowly, and ask which one is the opposite word.

Column 1: big, light, push, loud, stop
Column 2: small, dark, pull, quiet, go

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2. Explain: Explain that when one thing happens in the music, the exact opposite can happen too – music can be fast or slow, instruments can be big or small, round or square, etc.

    1. Recap what ‘forte’ means in music
    2. Show the ‘p’ sign and say that this sign is the opposite to the forte sign. What is the opposite?
    3. Ask how they think musicians must play their instruments when they see the ‘p’ sign.
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3. Introduce: Penelope Piano:
    1. Penelope Piano as Frederick Forte’s best friend who is completely opposite to him.
    2. Read the word piano together as a class.
    3. Explain that when the orchestra plays quiet or soft music, it is because Penelope Piano has appeared to tell then to play loudly.

Read through the poem together twice
– On the second reading, tell the class to read the poem quietly, whispering the word ‘soft’ when read.

 

 

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4. Responding to Words:
  1. If available, hand out untuned instruments to the class, otherwise the class can clap
  2. Tell the class they will now read different scenarios, and if they think Frederick Forte would appear, they should play their instruments really loudly, but otherwise they should play them very softly
  • In between the scenarios, you can select class members to explain why the scene would be loud or quiet

Scenarios: during a car journey, at a party, dinner time, in the playground, playing hide and seek, in the library

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 5. Recap:
  • Recap the story so far by looking at the pictures and reading the narration. Write numbers on the board. Ask the class to summarise the different scenes and then on the board, write the scenes in order: For example:

1 – Party with whole orchestra playing
2 – Prince arrives
3 – Prince’s song
4 – Violins play as they pack
5 – Prince’s song
6 – Cellos play worried music
7 – Freddy the French horn arrives

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6. Performing exercise: Responding to music:
    1. Hand out untuned instruments
    2. Play the music
    3. As the music plays, tell the class to call out the title of the scene which is happening as they play their instruments, and whether the music is forte/loud, piano/soft or a crescendo (reflecting volume in their playing) – write the answers next to the scene title on the board (f, p <)

Sing the song with actions during the chorus in a soft voice

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7. Discussion: Music and Story
    1. Go through each story sheet and recap which parts were played quietly
    2. Ask the class what was happening in those parts of the story which meant Penelope Piano told the instruments to play softer/quieter music

Make sure that you discuss the instruments that were playing through the music, and also recap the crescendo sections

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 8. Listening exercise: Responding to Words
    1. Have the class sit in a circle
    2. Hand out untuned instruments to each child, ready to play
    3. Name a list of random words, for example, apples, football, umbrella etc. then whisper the word ‘piano’, at which point the class must respond by playing their instruments, and quietly
    4. You can then have pupils suggest the list of words instead – advise classroom materials as prompts for their lists e.g. carpet, pencils, teacher
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9. Activity:
    1. Hand out a piece of A4 paper to each pupil.
      1. Have the children write out the Penelope Piano poem on their sheets, and draw a ‘p’ sign into a character to become Penelope Piano.
    2. Or: Hand out the opposite sheet for the class to match the words in column 1 to their correct antonym.
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Downloadable and Printable lesson content

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Lesson 9 – Preparation

There are 8 suggested activities below for the teacher to complete in order to prepare for teaching  ‘lesson content’ for lesson 9

Instructions: Music Clips: Pictures/videos:
1. Discussion: Opposites:

Prepare for a discussion on ‘opposites’ using the picture in the third column to aid the discussion. The picture consists of 2 columns – words in column 1 have a corresponding antonym/opposite in column 2

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2. Forte and Piano:

Learn the definition of ‘Piano’ as a rule in music, and become familiar with it’s symbol – understand that it is the opposite of ‘forte’

  • Piano (pi-yar-no) – means to play softly
  • Forte (for-tay) – means to play loudly 

Forte Definition:

Piano Definition:

Forte Symbol:

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Piano Symbol:

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3. The Music:
Take note of sections of music that are quiet and those that are loud or soft:

  • Make sure you practise clapping along (or playing along) with the music in order for you to be aware of when the sections are loud and when soft.
  • Correspond the sections with events in the story. For example, the introduction is loud because the orchestra are playing instruments during a party

4. Penelope Piano and Frederick Forte Poem:

  • Become familiar with Penelope Piano and Frederick Forte poems
  • Practice reading the poems until learned off-by-heart
  • Speak in a soft/loud voice
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5. Read the Story:

Read the whole storybook to recap the story – take note of what happens during sections played in piano and forte

Play the sound file in the next column to become familiar with how our narrated story matches the tone of the music 

 

 

6. Resources to bring to the lesson:

  • Percussion (untuned) instruments – one for each child
  • A printed copy of the forte sign and piano sign
  • A plain piece of A4 paper for each pupil
  • Writing and drawing equipment
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7. Key vocabulary: 

Forte

Piano

Forte Definition:

Piano Definition:

8. Run through:

The lesson aims & objectives (found when you first click on Lesson 9)

The ‘lesson content’  tab, where you will find exercises for this lesson:

  • Ensure you can do all of the exercises.
  • Read through the ‘lesson content’ repeatedly before teaching it in order to be prepared.
  • Play the slideshow (open slideshow button on top corner of page in ‘lesson content’) that will be displayed during the class
  • Download and print the lesson activity sheets at the bottom of the page in ‘lesson content’ – practice explaining the activities as you play the slideshow (see point above)
  • Plan your own answers to the questions you will ask the children to prompt them and retain focus.

The assessment & homework’ tasks for this lesson

The ‘background information’ tab, where teacher can find further information about the lesson, the story, and the music. 

 

Lesson 9: the ‘Piano’ symbol: ‘piano’ = ‘soft’

Topic 9 explores the theme of ‘opposites’. This is the third lesson on musical notation or symbols that serve as rules and instructions in the world of music.

The symbol that will be introduced today is:

  • Piano or p (pronounced p-yar-no) = quiet/soft

Forte and Crescendo will also be recapped.

In Lesson 9 you will explore:

  • The ‘forte’, ‘piano’ and ‘crescendo’ dynamics within a piece of music.
  • Connections between musical components and symbols.
  • Appropriate ‘sound’ responses in a variety of situations.
  • New Character: Penelope Piano.

 

Click here to go to Preparation
Click here to go to Lesson Content

Click here to go to Assessment

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Background Information

The aim of lesson 8 is to learn about the ‘F’ or Forte sign and it’s significance in music. This lesson will also aim to build on knowledge of written notation and rhythm.

Index for the table:

1. Discussions

2. Dynamics in Music

3. Teaching Tips for lesson

1. Discussions:

 The theme for this lesson focuses on appropriate sounds/loudness for specific situations that relate to emotion This theme correlates to music through the notion of different musical ‘dynamics’, or loudness instructions that are written within the music that musicians have to follow when playing instruments, and how the loudness tells the story/conveys the emotions of the characters and events.
2. Dynamics in Music:
Definition: 

Dynamics are musical instructions notated on a musical piece in order to instruct the musician on which volume to play the music. These instructions are often seen as abbreviations of certain Italian words or symbols on a piece of music, above certain phrases or notes.
History:
Dynamics were not actually used until the late 18th century, although there were some composers who used them earlier. Dynamics were not necessarily needed, beforehand, as a lot of instruments at the time only had two volumes, loud and soft.
3. Tips for the lesson:
In Voyage to the Moon, the sign is introduced to the children as Frederick Forte and it is important to emphasise him as a bold and loud character to help the class to recognise and remember the sign. When you have read the poem, ask individual children to say Frederick Forte in their loudest voice.

If there are any children who speak a second language, ask them to share a translation for ‘loud’ and have the class repeat the new word together.

Allow room for discussion for the children to suggest ideas for when they hear loud volumes at home – this will enable the students to learn more about each other, and also a chance for the teacher to hear about home life.

Lesson 8 – Assessment & Homework

Homework for lesson 8 can be found at the bottom of this page

Assessment:

1) Questioning     2) Crescendo Skills Ladder      3) Musical Terms       4) Story     5) Self-Assessment

1) Questioning:

Become familiar with the different types of questions that can be asked throughout lesson 8. Questions for each heading increase in level of difficulty.

Take note of answering abilities of pupils to log in the assessment tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the questioning:

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2) Crescendo Skills Ladder:

Become familiar with the different criteria of skills that are to be assessed. Level 1 is the lowest, level 5 being the highest.

Take note during the lessons of pupil development to insert into their development tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Crescendo Ladder:

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3) Musical Terms: Assessment:

Become familiar with the ‘Musical Terms’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of musical terms. The pupils must connect the word to the corresponding picture.

TIP: Act out the pictures as a class. Point to the pictures in turn and ascribe actions to them. Some students may recognise the pictures (e.g. a French horn), but may have English as a second language, therefore not yet able to link the picture to the word.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Musical Terms Assessment sheet:

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4) Story: Assessment

Become familiar with the ‘Story’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of the story. The pupils must write the word above the corresponding picture.

TIP: Read the poem with the class first: say the word ‘loud’ very loudly, and make an ‘f’ with your fingers each time you say ‘f’.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Story Assessment sheet:

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5) Self-Assessment [optional]:

This is an OPTIONAL assessment sheet. Self-assessment should start as early as possible once pupils have settled into the school year, and at the discretion of the teacher. 

Print a copy for each member of the class. Pupils should indicate the level (between 1-5) that they believe they are at for each category.

Teachers will want to collect these in once completed – and file away.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Self-Assessment sheet:

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Homework

Print a copy of the homework sheet for each pupil. Pupils are to write out the musical terms in the right-hand columns.

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Lesson Content

OPEN SLIDESHOW

There are 13 exercises to complete during Lesson 8.

  • Before the lesson:
    • Scroll down the page to view information about each exercise
    • Ensure you have read through the preparation guide to this lesson
  • During the lesson:
    • Press ‘open slideshow’ in the top right corner of the page to display and play lesson resources to the class.
    • Download & print the lesson content information at the bottom of this page to reference during class

Lesson Content + Exercise Information:

1. Discussion: Loud Noises:
  1. Discuss animals or objects that make loud noises and create the noises they make.
  2. Discuss why and how it makes this noise and what this noise makes you feel.
  3. Suggestions e.g. a lion’s roar, school bell (excited), a police siren, a baby crying etc.
 
2. Explain connection between ‘loudness’ with the music and story events:
  1. Explain how the orchestra in Voyage to the Moon can play loudly at times (sometimes just loud, sometimes very loud).
  2. When they play loudly it usually means something fun, exciting or scary is happening in the prince’s story.
  3. The ‘loudness’ helps us understand what is going on in the story and how the characters are feeling
  4. Play the music from the grand party
  5. Ask pupils if they recognise the music, which story event it goes with and why then the music being played loudly? – because it is a party.

3. Introduce ‘Forte’:
  1. Introduce the Frederick Forte symbol and asks if anyone recognises the letter (f).
  2. Read the word forte together as a class.
  3. Explain that ‘forte’ is the Italian word for loud (here you can ask if any pupils know the word for ‘loud’ in another language).
  4. Explain that when the orchestra plays loud music, it is because Frederick Forte has appeared to tell then to play loudly.
  5. Say ‘forte’ as a class first whispering, then loudly and ask individuals to say it on their own.
  6. Go round the class – one pupil is to say ‘forte’ and then the next to say ‘loud’, all the way round the class (helps build concentration). You can also have pupils say loud in another language.

 

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4. Time to Make Loud Sounds, Song:
  1. Ask if the class knows the word ‘pound’ and if they think it would be a loud or quiet noise.
  2. Explain that when you hit something hard, like a drum, it means you pound it – have everyone repeat the word pound with you – explain they will now use the word pound in a song
    Teach the words and actions to the ‘loud sounds’ song:

Clap my hands, 1 2 3, pound, pound, pound; now it is _______’s turn to make a loud sound

  • Go around the circle, starting with the teacher, and have everyone sing the ‘loud sound’ song – insert the name of a child and have them make loud noises at the end of the song (using a drum, clapping, their voices etc. – if a drum is used, pass it round the circle in turn).
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Recording: Piano & Vocals:

Recording: Piano Only:

5. The Frederick Forte Poem:
  1. Explain that this is Frederick’s special poem and we are going to read it how Frederick would.
  2. Discuss how they think Frederick would be (angry, proud, happy, sad etc.) and choose an emotion to portray as you read.
  3. Read together as a class.
  4. For concentration – have the class ‘clap their hands’ whenever they say the word ‘f’, and pat their legs whenever they say ‘loud’.
  5. Repeat for fluency.

 

6. Responding to Words: If available, hand out untuned instruments to the class, otherwise the class can clap

Tell the class they will now read different scenarios, and if they think Frederick Forte would appear, they should play their instruments really loudly, but otherwise they should play them very softly

  • In between the scenarios, you can select class members to explain why the scene would be loud or quiet

Scenarios: during a car journey, playing hide and seek, at a party, in the playground, at dinner time, in the library

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 7. Recap the crescendo symbol: Recap the meaning of a crescendo sign (getting gradually louder).

Invite a volunteer to demonstrate a crescendo on an untuned instrument.

Ask the pupils if they think Frederick forte would appear at the beginning or the end of the crescendo (the end – that is where the music gets loudest. He could even appear in the middle if the music was loud enough).

You can draw a forte symbol on the board in the position you believe the forte should be placed.

 

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8. Performing exercise: Responding to music:
  1. Hand out untuned instruments
  2. Play the music (beginning until final verse) – discuss which instruments are playing and what events are happening.
  3. When the music is loud, hold up the ‘forte sheet’ for the class and they must play loud music, playing quietly and engaging in discussion about what is happening in the music when the forte sheet is not being shown
  4. When there is a crescendo, hold up the ‘crescendo sheet’ for the class and they must play their instruments in a crescendo

Sing the song with actions during the chorus OR sing the rhythm (numbers of beats instead of words).

Only the first part of the chorus is display to work on memory!

 

 

 

 

 

9. Recap rhythm, introduce the term ‘crotchet’ and different time signatures:
  1. Explain that before we explore playing forte in the music, we need to recap our work about ‘rhythm’.
  2. Recap knowledge about ‘beats’ and rhythm in music.
  3. Explain that a 1 Beat note is called a crotchet (have the class repeat the word, clapping for each syllable).
  4. Recap time signature and have the class clap the 2 bars, counting to 3 in each bar.
  5. Show the class how the time signature changes from 3 to 2 beats in the bar.
  6. Ask for a volunteers to come and draw the number of crotchets needed for the final bar.
  7. Clap the whole line as a class, counting out loud (the final bar will need to be slower, as there are only 2 beats to make up the bar).

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10. Introduce ‘quavers’:
  1. Explain that a note with a tail is called a quaver. A crotchet = 1 and a quaver = 1/2 (have the class repeat the word, clapping for each syllable).
  2. Ask the class how many quavers = a crotchet (2 as there are 2 halves in a whole).
  3. If fractions are yet to be studied (or for visual learners), use the cake pictures to explain this further e.g. if a crotchet is like one whole cake, I cut the cake in half and have 2 halves.
  4. Once you arrive at the music written on staves (on music paper), explain this further. Point to the first bar and show the class how to count it: hold up your hand to the class in a fist. Hold up first your thumb, then index then middle finger, saying ‘1, 2, 3’ slowly for each finger (do this twice).
  5. For the second bar, Keep the pace of your fingers as above, but instead say ‘1 and’ for you thumb ‘2 and’ for your index finger, and ‘3 and’ for your middle finger.
  6. Clap and say beat numbers together as a class (repeating each bar twice), then ask for individuals to demonstrate alone 1 bar after another.
  7. Have a volunteer come to the board and draw the correct notes in the blank spaces (crotchet crotchet quaver quaver).

11. Introduce Joined Quavers:
  1. Explain how the tail joins 2 quavers together. So if you see this in music, it just means 2 quavers.
  2. Clap bars 1 and 3 with the class, counting out loud.
  3. Ask for a volunteer to fill in bar 2 with notes (2 sets of joined quavers followed by a crotchet) and to write the values below the notes in bar 3.
  4. Hand out untuned instruments and play the whole line as a class (softly!)

12. Rhythm Work using Part 1 of Verse 1:
  1. Explain how Frederick Forte appears on written music with music notes. This is how the musicians know when to play loudly.
  2. Play the music and explain that the written music is what musicians would see when they play this part of the music (when the king held the party awaiting the arrival of Prince Caprice).
  3. Ask the class to point out where the 3 beat rhythm changes in each line.
  4. Without music, clap slowly as a class (point at each written note in turn), counting out loud. (Tell pupils to count and clap loudly, but not shouting).
  5. Invite pupils up to the front of the class in groups of 3 and hand the 3 an untuned instrument each.
  6. Play the music and have each trio play loudly in turn. Other pupils to clap softly along, to prepare for their turn.

 

 

 

 

13. Extra Activity:
  1. Hand a piece of A4 paper to each pupil.
  2. Have the pupils write out the Frederick Forte poem on their sheets, and draw an ‘f’ sign into a character to become Frederick Forte.
 

Downloadable and Printable lesson content

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Lesson 8 – Preparation

There are 14 suggested activities below for the teacher to complete in order to prepare for teaching  ‘lesson content’ for lesson 8

Instructions: Music Clips: Pictures/videos:
1. Discussion: Loud Noises:

Prepare for a discussion on ‘loud noises’. Prepare questions that will prompt pupils to suggest animals or other objects that make loud noises, and why they do this.

2. Forte:

Learn the definition of ‘Forte’ as a rule in music, and become familiar with it’s symbol

  • Forte (for-tay) – means to play loudly 

Forte Definition:

Forte Symbol:

Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 18.41.10

3. The Music:
Take note of sections of music that are quiet and those that are loud:

  • Make sure you practise clapping along (or playing along) with the music in order for you to be aware of when the sections are loud and when soft.
  • Correspond the sections with events in the story. For example, the introduction is loud because the orchestra are playing instruments during a party

4. Frederick Forte Poem:

  • Become familiar with Frederick Forte
  • Practice reading the poem until learned off-by-heart
  • Speak in a slow, mellow voice

5. Learn the ‘Time to Make Loud Sounds’ Song:

Learn the lyrics fluently and practice inserting pupils names into the blank space.

Recording: Piano & Vocals:

Recording: Piano Only:

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6. Recapping rhythm:

Go to Lesson 7 preparation to recap knowledge on rhythm from the previous lesson before progressing to preparation activity 7 below.

7. Different Music Notes & their Beat Values:

A ‘crotchet’ or Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 10.04.35, is only one type of music note.

The Beat sheet explains the values of music notes relevant for this lesson

Practice playing the beats on picture 2.

Sometimes a piece can change its’ time signature several times.

Music can switch rhythms e.g. between a ‘2-beat’ and ‘3-beat’ rhythm as in picture 2 (see exercise 9, the introduction for practical examples).

Screen Shot 2016-09-09 at 09.02.56

 

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8. Quavers, Joined Quavers, and Crotchets:

In this lesson, you will only focus on these 3 different beat values.

A quaver has a value of half a crotchet.

9. Practice playing the crotchets and quavers to the introduction:

  1. Clap and count to the music.
  2. Play an instrument and count to the music.
  3. Practice pointing at each note on your screen (or on the whiteboard) as the music plays for when you will direct the class.
  4. Practice all until fluent.

10. Recap the ‘Crescendo’ Sign:

  • Crescendo is a musical instruction
  • It is the Italian term for ‘growing’.
  • Musical term for ‘getting gradually louder’
  • Practice creating crescendos with your voice, by clapping and when playing instruments such as drums or bells

Crescendo Definition:

Creating a Crescendo:

Crescendo Symbol:

Screen Shot 2016-09-07 at 06.25.52

11. Read the Story:

Read the whole storybook to recap the story – take note of what happens during sections played in forte

Play the sound file in the next column to become familiar with how our narrated story matches the tone of the music 

 

 

12. Resources to bring to the lesson:

  • Percussion (untuned) instruments – one for each child
  • A printed copy of the forte sign
  • A plain piece of A4 paper for each pupil
  • Writing and drawing equipment
Screen Shot 2016-09-06 at 18.41.10
13. Key vocabulary: 

 

Forte

Forte Definition:

14. Run through:

The lesson aims & objectives (found when you first click on Lesson 8)

The ‘lesson content’  tab, where you will find exercises for this lesson:

  • Ensure you can do all of the exercises.
  • Read through the ‘lesson content’ repeatedly before teaching it in order to be prepared.
  • Play the slideshow (open slideshow button on top corner of page in ‘lesson content’) that will be displayed during the class
  • Download and print the lesson activity sheets at the bottom of the page in ‘lesson content’ – practice explaining the activities as you play the slideshow (see point above)
  • Plan your own answers to the questions you will ask the children to prompt them and retain focus.

The assessment & homework’ tasks for this lesson

The ‘background information’ tab, where teacher can find further information about the lesson, the story, and the music.