Recommended Music

Recommended pieces of music

The links below will take you to recommended pieces of music that can be played during colouring activities, or set as the YouTube Class or Homework activity. You must have a link to the Internet to play these pieces and clicking on a link will redirect you to YouTube. To set them as a homework, you will have to send the URL (www.example.com) of each YouTube link home to parents or guardians. Alternatively the exercise can be done in class in a group or set individually. They are pieces played by instruments learned in class and are listed in alphabetical order. The title of each piece is above the video and the answers for the activity sheets are below each video link on this page. If there are children who would like a challenging piece, the word (Hard) will be written next to the title of the music. In these pieces, there may be many different moods throughout the piece, or the number of instruments may be harder to count, or the tempo may change. A child attempting a challenging piece can mark answers on the back of their activity sheet in a format advised by their teacher. A hard piece can also be worked on in a big group; the teacher can ask questions about tempo, number of instruments, mood and colour of instruments, and children can call out answers. Make sure to ask the children why they have chosen their answers and what the music reminds them of and makes them feel e.g. going on holiday, falling over, being extremely happy. NB: if you would like more recommended music, please contact the SymbolSmash team via email (found in the support section)

Cello

Chopin Sonata for Cello and Piano, Op.65

Colours: Brown

No. of Cellos: 1

Tempo: Fast

Mood: Angry, Sad, Worried

 

Mendelssohn – Song without words Op.109

Colours: Brown

No. of Cellos: 1

Tempo: Slow

Mood: Calm, Sad, Thoughtful

 

Flute

Chopin Nocturne Op.9 No.2

Colours: Silver

No. of Flutes: 1

Tempo: Slow (with a fast ending)

Mood: Calm, Dreamy, Happy (Angry when the music turns fast at the end)

 

Bach – Sonata in A Minor (HARD)

Colours: Silver

No. of Flutes: 1

Tempo: Fast (After 5 minutes the piece becomes slow. At the 9 minute mark the piece is fast again)

Mood: Bouncy, Sad, Surprised (the piece alternates between Happy and Sad often but remains Bouncy and Surprised until the piece changes tempo after 5 minutes and then becomes Calm, Sad and Thoughtful. When the tempo changes again at 9 minutes, the piece becomes Bouncy, Sad, Surprised and Worried. A few minutes later, the Sad changes to Happy and then back to Sad)

 

French Horn

Beethoven Sonata No.17 Allegro Moderato

Colours: Gold

No. of French Horns: 1

Tempo: Fast 

Mood: Dreamy, Excited, Happy (later on in the music, there is a section where it turns Sad and then becomes Happy again.)

 

Mozart Concerto #1 in D

Colours: Gold

No. of French Horns: 1

Tempo: Fast

Mood: Bouncy, Excited, Happy, 

 

Oboe

Albrecht Mayer et Helene Grimaud Op. 94

Colours: Black & Silver

No. of Oboes: 1

Tempo: Slow

Mood: Dreamy, Thoughtful, Sad

 

Mozart Oboe Concerto – Allegro Aperto Orchestra

Colours: Black & Silver

No. of Oboes: 1 solo (there are two others in the Orchestra, so the answer of 3 is acceptable)

Tempo: Fast

Mood: Bouncy, Excited, Happy

 

Violin

Schubert – Serenade

 

Colours: Brown

No. of Violins: 1 (there are others shown in the orchestra but they are not being played)

Tempo: Slow

Mood: Dreamy, Sad, Thoughtful

 

Vivaldi – The Four Seasons Spring (HARD)

Colours: Brown

No. of Violins: 1 solo, a quartet on the right (4) and 7 on the left (An answer of 10+ is acceptable)

Tempo: Fast (in the middle of the piece, the music turns slower and then becomes faster, and then slower, then faster again. The music will continue to alternate in this fashion and the child will have to mark how many times)

Mood: Bouncy, Excited, Happy, Surprised (there is a section where the music turns Sad and Worried before repeating the first set of emotions. The music changes again later on and becomes Sad, Thoughtful. It changes once again after this to Dreamy, Happy and Surprised, then back to Sad and Thoughtful, then Bouncy and Happy. The music will continue to alternate in this fashion and the child will have to mark how many times)

Background Information

Lesson 5 – Assessment & Homework

Homework for lesson 5 can be found at the bottom of this page

Assessment:

1) Questioning     2) Crescendo Skills Ladder      3) Musical Terms       4) Story     5) Self-Assessment

1) Questioning:

Become familiar with the different types of questions that can be asked throughout lesson 5. Questions for each heading increase in level of difficulty.

Take note of answering abilities of pupils to log in the assessment tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the questioning:

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2) Crescendo Skills Ladder:

Become familiar with the different criteria of skills that are to be assessed. Level 1 is the lowest, level 5 being the highest.

Take note during the lessons of pupil development to insert into their development tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Crescendo Ladder:

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3) Musical Terms: Assessment:

Become familiar with the ‘Musical Terms’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of musical terms. The pupils must connect the word to the corresponding picture.

TIP: Act out the pictures as a class. Point to the pictures in turn and ascribe actions to them. Some students may recognise the pictures (e.g. a cello), but may have English as a second language, therefore not yet able to link the picture to the word.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Musical Terms Assessment sheet:

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4) Story: Assessment

Become familiar with the ‘Story’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of the story. The pupils must write the word above the corresponding picture.

TIP: Discuss the different pictures and connect them to learned concepts, either through pages from the story, or through actions/discussion.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Story Assessment sheet:

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5) Self-Assessment [optional]:

This is an OPTIONAL assessment sheet. Self-assessment should start as early as possible once pupils have settled into the school year, and at the discretion of the teacher. 

Print a copy for each member of the class. Pupils should indicate the level (between 1-5) that they believe they are at for each category.

Teachers will want to collect these in once completed – and file away.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Self-Assessment sheet:

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D

Homework

  1. Homework sheet 1 draw lines to match the words to the correct pictures.lesson-5-homework-1Answers:

    scan
  2. Homework 2: Spot the difference sheet
    screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-12-39-22Differences are:

    1. Title of the music (one in French)
    2. The position of holding the violin
    3. Princess Fantasia’s crown
    4. Direction of stripes on the French flag
    5. Age of the composer when he learned to play the violin

lesson-5-hoemowrk

Lesson Content

OPEN SLIDESHOW

There are 5 exercises to complete during Lesson 5.

  • Before the lesson:
    • Scroll down the page to view information about each exercise
    • Ensure you have read through the preparation guide to this lesson
  • During the lesson:
    • Press ‘open slideshow’ in the top right corner of the page to display and play lesson resources to the class.
    • Download & print the lesson content information at the bottom of this page to reference during class

Lesson Content + Exercise Information:

1. Discussion: Authors: Authors:

  1. Discuss different stories and their authors that the children are familiar with (either real or cartoon).
  2. Discuss the job role of and author.

 

2. Explain the connection between authors of books and composers of music: Explain that music has been created by a special type of author called a ‘composer’ and today they will learn about the composer of Voyage to the Moon.

Discuss what the purpose of their work is – to tell us a story, to give us interesting things to listen to or read.

 

3. Recap the whole of the story so far but only using the overview picture as a prompt: Recap the storyline of Voyage to the Moon– you can use the Overview Picture to help you.  

4. Discussion: Jacques Offenbach:
  1. Discussion: Jacques Offenbach. Either show the class the video and ask questions afterwards, or go through the facts about Offenbach using the ‘composer fact sheets’. Questions to ask
    1. What was the name of the composer
    2. Where did he live
    3. What instruments did he play
    4. How old was he when he learned to play the violin

What kind of music did he like to write

5. Composer Lesson Activity: Composer Lesson Activity:
The class will now be shown six different pictures/question sheets. For each one, invite volunteers up to the front of the class. Have untuned instruments or classroom props that can substitute as drums etc. ready. The pictures are listed in order. Below, you will find a list of the props you can use or the questions you can ask with each picture.
  1. P1: Picture of Offenbach
  2. P2: Picture of French symbols
  3. P3: Offenbach playing the violin
  4. P4: Offenbach hiding behind the cello
  5. P5: Prince Caprice and Princess Fantasia
  6. P6: Picture of a stage and audience

See the pictures in the rows below

Question for picture 1 What is the name of the person in the picture?

Complete the sentence: he is the man who made the _ _ _ _ _

Using untuned instruments can you make your own rhythm? Create a sequence and the class is to copy you by clapping. Give as many people who want a go.

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Question for picture 2 What country does this flag belong to?

The man who made the music is from this country. What is his name?

Choose an instrument to play. Count the pastries on the page and play one beat on your instrument each time you count a pastry.

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Question for picture 3 What instrument is Mr. Offenbach playing in the picture?

How old was he when he learned to play this instrument?

Does the violin have a high or a low pitch?

Can you pick an instrument from the box that has a high pitch and play us a tune?

Sing a song you know in a high-pitch voice.

How do you hold a violin and bow?

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Question for picture 4 What is Mr. Offenbach doing in this picture?

What is the name of the instrument and it’s character?

Where is your favourite place to hide in Hide & Seek?

Does the cello have a high or a low-pitch?

Can you sing a song in a low-pitch?

What family are the violin and cello from?

How do you hold the cello?

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Question for picture 5 What is the name of the piece of music we have been listening to?

How many years ago was it written?

What is it about?

For the whole class: play the music and have them pretend to be either a prince or a princess as they dance around the class or play untuned instruments.

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Question for picture 6 What are the people called who are watching the show?

Where is there an audience in this room?

When have you been a part of an audience outside of this class?

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Homework
  • Homework sheet 1 – draw lines to match the words to the correct pictures.
  • Homework 2: Spot the difference sheet
lesson-5-homework-1 screen-shot-2016-09-27-at-12-39-22

Downloadable and Printable lesson content

 

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Lesson 5: Composer of Music

Topic 5 is to introduce the children to the composer of Voyage to the Moon; Jacques Offenbach; The composer!
In Lesson 5 you will explore:

  • The role of authors of books and composers of music.
  • A brief history of the composer of ‘Voyage to the Moon’ – Jacques Offenbach.
  • Previously learned concepts from Voyage to the Moon, applying these in performance and discussion activities based on the life of the composer.

Click here to go to Preparation
Click here to go to Lesson Content

Click here to go to Assessment

 

Background Information

The aim of this lesson is to be able to recognise the sounds and the features of a new instrument – the Cello, and to distinguish features with that of the violin.

Index for the table:

1. Discussions

2. The String Family

3. The Cello

4. Cedric Cello

1. Discussions:

The theme of this lesson revolves around the idea of Family.
  • A discussion about families with the children gives the adult an insight into the child’s home life and who surrounds them.
  • When speaking about families also mention the notion of the extended family (i.e. cousins, grandparents, aunts and uncles) as some children may not only be surrounded by immediate family.
It also helps the children understand the concept by allowing them to personalise the topic. This discussion should also include similarities and differences between our family and us (e.g. who is taller – you or your brother?).

 2. The String Family:

Instruments are grouped into ‘families’ based on their design and the way sound is created.
  • The cello and the violin are both from the same familythe String family – and in appearance the cello looks like a very big violin with a few varying features (see preparation for more information)
  • They also produce a similar sound or timbre, the main and distinctive difference lying in pitch – the cello having a low-pitch, and the violin having a high-pitch
This lesson will explore the difference between high-pitched and low-pitched sounds, which is easily done by comparing the sounds of the violin versus those of the cello.

3. The Cello:

Name:
The Cello received its name from its ancestors Italian name ‘violoncello’, which in the 17th century was the lowest pitched instrument of the string family.
Description:
The cello is the second-largest string instrument in the orchestra. Similarities can be found between the cello and other string instruments, such as the violin, in terms of its body shape (hour glass) and the way it is played (bow/plucked); however there are major differences. The cello is a large instrument and is played sitting down. It has an end-pin at the bottom of it body which helps it stand on the floor and supports its weight.
The cello is mostly used in European Classical music and its sound is very low. Most often its sound is described as the most familiar in resemblance to the human voice.
History:
The cello was first invented in the 16th century in Bologna, Italy. It was mostly made for a solo repertoire however was also used in quartets. Its sound was thought to be too soft for church music, so it was accompanied by the organ in most cases.
Cellos were standardised and popularised in the 18th century.
Position:
The Cello is part of the orchestra, which normally has about 8-12 Cellos.
The cello section is situated on the righthand side of the stage, directly opposite the ‘first violin’ section. Cellos play a  very important role in an orchestra and are most often required to play low harmonies; as well as solos.
A musician who plays the Cello is known as a cellist. The principal cellist (main player) is the leader of this section and is sat closest to the audience.

4. Cedric Cello:

The cello is introduced to the children as Cedric Cello, and to help the children understand its’ ties to the string family we say Cedric is Violet the Violins’ older brother.
In our story, Cedric and Violet have a strong relationship – they play together and Cedric worries for Violet’s safety. Make sure you come prepared with lots of discussion points about families!
You can also use untuned instruments to show the difference between high and low (triangles/bells for high, drums/wooden blocks for low).

Lesson 4 – Assessment & Homework

Homework for lesson 4 can be found at the bottom of this page

Assessment:

1) Questioning     2) Crescendo Skills Ladder      3) Musical Terms       4) Story     5) Self-Assessment

1) Questioning:

Become familiar with the different types of questions that can be asked throughout lesson 4. Questions for each heading increase in level of difficulty.

Take note of answering abilities of pupils to log in the assessment tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the questioning:

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2) Crescendo Skills Ladder:

Become familiar with the different criteria of skills that are to be assessed. Level 1 is the lowest, level 5 being the highest.

Take note during the lessons of pupil development to insert into their development tracker.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Crescendo Ladder:

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3) Musical Terms: Assessment:

Become familiar with the ‘Musical Terms’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of musical terms. The pupils must connect the word to the corresponding picture.

TIP: Act out the pictures as a class. Point to the pictures in turn and ascribe actions to them. Some students may recognise the pictures (e.g. a cello), but may have English as a second language, therefore not yet able to link the picture to the word.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Musical Terms Assessment sheet:

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4) Story: Assessment

Become familiar with the ‘Story’ sheet, and the answer sheet.

Print a copy for each member of the class (unanswered sheet!). This is a great way for the teacher to assess the understanding of the story. The pupils must write the word above the corresponding picture.

TIP: Perform the poem with actions once before beginning and discuss elements.

You can also read through the words together using phonics before beginning the exercise.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Story Assessment sheet:

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5) Self-Assessment [optional]:

This is an OPTIONAL assessment sheet. Self-assessment should start as early as possible once pupils have settled into the school year, and at the discretion of the teacher. 

Print a copy for each member of the class. Pupils should indicate the level (between 1-5) that they believe they are at for each category.

Teachers will want to collect these in once completed – and file away.

Here is a downloadable and printable copy of the Self-Assessment sheet:

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DHomework

Ask the children to find out about one cellist or an interesting fact about the cello with their parents/guardian, and their opinion about it: to be shared either at the beginning of lesson 5 or in another class e.g. sharing time

Lesson Structure

OPEN SLIDESHOW

There are 13 exercises to complete during Lesson 4.

  • Before the lesson:
    • Scroll down the page to view information about each exercise.
    • Ensure you have read through the preparation guide to this lesson.
  • During the lesson:
    • Press ‘open slideshow’ in the top right corner of the page to display and play lesson resources to the class.
    • Download & print the lesson content information at the bottom of this page to reference during class.

Lesson Content + Exercise Information:

1. Discussion: Family: Ask the children about the members of their families.

Discuss any similarities/differences between family members e.g. likes/dislikes, appearances etc. surname

Show picture of Prince Caprice and his family – discuss similarities and differences between him and his parents.

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2. Introduce ‘instrument families’ in relation to the story: Explain that Prince Caprice’s instrument friends all come from one very large family.

  1. Show the class the orchestra picture.
  2. Explain that within the huge orchestra family there are a lot of smaller families.
  3. Recap the information about the violin.

3. Discussion: Instrument Families:

The String Family:

Explain how the instruments in the orchestra all come from different families. Instruments in the same family can look similar, and sound similar. They also can be slightly different.

Explain that one family is called the Brass family and one is called the String family.

Display the picture of Violet the Violin, and ask if the class think she comes from the Brass or String family and why (string because you play her strings to make music).

Show the video of the String Quartet and explain that these are the different instruments from the String family. Ask the class to point out Violet the Violin. Discuss the sizes of the instruments and how music is being made (pulling a bow across the strings).

Tell the class that instruments in the String family are all made from the same material – ask if it is metal or wood (look at colour).

Use next picture to decide which instrument is Violet’s brother:

  1. Which other instrument do you think belongs to Violet the Violins family?
  2. Why do we think they belong to the same family? – look at the colour

Explain that today we will meet Violet the Violin’s older brother

  1. Ask if anyone knows his name?

His name is Cedric Cello (pronounced Ch-e-low)

 

String Family instruments playing together:

From left to right:
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass

4. Introduce Cedric Cello and build comparisons with Violet the Violin: Read the poem together with the class twice through.
Cedric Cello Poem:“I’m Cedric Cello big and bold,
you must be sitting down to hold
and pull my bow across the strings
to make low sounds and music things!”Show picture of Cedric and Violet and play the videoAsk the class what differences/similarities they can see already between the two instruments

  • Explain to the children that the Cello has a low pitch.
  • Compare the Violin and Cello’s pitch.

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5. Demonstrate how a cellist holds and plays a cello:
  1. Show the class how to hold the cello and bow, using your cardboard cutout or just your hands.
  2. Create the movements to play the cello [seen in the preparation video] and have the class copy you.
  3. Show the video clip of the cello playing.
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6. Singing: Pitch Exercise:
  • Explore making high- and low-pitch sounds by discussing familiar noises that have either a high- or low-pitch (animals, vehicle noises etc.)
7. Performing: Pitch Exercise:
  • Hand out untuned/percussion instruments
  • The teacher is to sing high and low notes in turn, and the children must play their instruments either held high above their head or low to the ground to match the pitch
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 8. Listening for and responding to ‘pitch’ in the music Exercise Play the first part of the third verse.

  1. The violins and cellos are playing separate tunes here.
  2. The cellos play the melody (or main tune), whilst the violins play the harmony (the background/accompaniment)

Discuss the pitch of each instrument and explain the difference (cello=low, violin=high).

Analyse the tone of the cellos music by discussing the different elements of its music:

  1. tone = scared then happy because:
  2. duration = jumpy
  3. tempo = quite fast
  4. pitch = low
  5. timbre = heavy

Repeat the music and have the children pretend to play cellos low to the ground as the music plays. They should match the tone of the cellos music on their faces and through bodily actions e.g. ‘stomping’ their feet.

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9. Performing to music exercise:
  1. Hand out untuned/percussion instruments.
  2. Play the whole piece of music
  3. Split class into two (one to be ‘low’ and one to be ‘high’) and as the music plays point at each group as the pitch of the music changes. Have them play the instruments when it is their turn.
 

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10. Story Time:
  1. Explain that the class will now hear what happened in the story when Cedric played his music.
  2. Read pages 9, 10, 11, 12 of story.

Afterwards, discuss what happened in the story, including the mood and how it changed (exciting, shocking etc.)

Page 9:

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Page 10:

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Pages 11 and 12:

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 11. Movement to Music:
  1. Sing the Prince’s song (with actions) in a low pitch to Cello chorus.
  2. Play the third verse of the music and ask children to move around the class.
    1. When the music has a high-pitch they must have their hands high in the air as they move.
    2. When it is low they must crawl on the floor.
    3. When it is medium they can perform in their own style.
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Recording: Piano & Vocals:

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12.  Activity:  

    1. Hand out the activity sheet to fill in.
    2. Ask children to decorate their own cello and bow.
  • Teacher – KEEP THE CUT OUT SAFE – in order to use for VTTM Assembly!!
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13. Extra Activity (optional)
  • Become a Cello and Cellist (musician who plays a cello)
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Downloadable and Printable lesson content

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Preparation

There are 12 suggested activities below for the teacher to complete in order to prepare for teaching  ‘lesson content’ for lesson 4

Instructions: Music Clips: Pictures/videos:
1. Discussion: Family

Prepare for a discussion on ‘family’


Prepare questions to prompt the children to share information about their family members, as well as ‘similarities and differences’ between members of the same family (appearances, likes, dislikes, pitch of voice etc.)

2. The ‘String Family’: Violin & Cello:
Become familiar with the different instruments that play the ‘Voyage to the Moon’ music, and the ‘families’ they belong to, especially the ‘String Family

  • String Family – Violin, Cello  
  • Brass – French Horn  
  • Woodwind – Oboe, Flute

Note similarities/differences in appearance between the violin and cello

1. Size: the violin is much smaller than the cello
2. Placement: the cello has a very long pin that rests against the floor; the violin has a chin rest that rests under your chin
3. Pitch: the cello has a low pitch; the violin has a high pitch

The Violin and Cello are from the ‘String’ Family

 violin violetcedric cello

The French Horn is from the ‘Brass’ Family

Freddy the French Horn

The Oboe and Flute are from the ‘Woodwind’ Family

Olive the Oboe Flora Flute

 

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String Family instruments playing together:

From left to right:
Violin, Viola, Cello, Double Bass

3. Read the Story:

Read the whole storybook to become familiar with the story. Take note of:


Any characters – for this lesson: Cedric Cello

Play the sound file in the next column to become familiar with our narrated story to music 

 

 

Relevant story pages for this lesson: 9-12:

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4. ‘Cedric Cello’ Poem:

  • Practice reading the poem until learned off-by-heart
  • Speak in a low pitch

 

 
5. The violin and cello – sounds & appearance:

Become familiar with features of the Cello in comparison to the violin.

Become familiar with how the Cello is held, and how it sounds.

 

1. Size: the violin is much smaller than the cello
2. Placement: the cello has a very long pin that rests against the floor; the violin has a chin rest that rests under your chin
3. Pitch: the cello has a low pitch; the violin has a high pitch

Cello playing the introduction tune:

Violin playing the introduction tune:

Whole orchestra playing the introduction tune:

Video of cellos and violins playing:

Video of cellist + violinist together (from 1:30)

 

6. Pitch:

Prepare a list of familiar animals that create both low and high pitch sounds e.g. a high-pitch squeak of a mouse

7. Holding String Instruments:

Recap how to hold the violin, and learn how to hold the cello

  • Practice with and without the music (verse 2 of Voyage to the moon – only the violins are playing and then verse 3 where high and low pitch alternate)
  • When practicing with the music, match the speed/tempo of the music

Verse 2 – violins only:

Verse 3 – alternate between ‘high’ and ‘low’:

8. Verse 3 of the Music:

The cellos play the beginning of verse 3. Then the pitch alternates between high and low for the rest of the verse as other instruments join in:

  • Take note of the tone of the cellos at the beginning of verse 3 – scared worried, angry- and how the tone lightens as the verse continues. The violins are playing in the background – the high pitch notes
  • Practice narrating that the music sounds worried because Cedric Cello is worried that his sister will get hurt on the adventure. It then turns lighter as Violet convinces Cedric to join her and he is much happier (see story page 12 to help)
  • Instruments! Practice playing instruments to match the tempo (speed) of the high and low pitch instruments – hold your instrument high in the air or low to the ground to indicate ‘high’ or ‘low’ pitch

Third verse of music:

Chorus Music Only – Cello plays HARMONY in background:

For the ANALYSING THE MUSIC activity: 

Musical tone is created because of other musical elements. The ‘tone’ created by the cello is scared, worried or angry. This is created because of the:

  1. Duration: lots of jumpy notes
  2. Pitch: low
  3. Tempo: quite fast (like a heart beat)
  4. Timbre (distinctive sound of the cello): heavy and booming
9. A cellist & a cello:

Watch the video that demonstrates two children acting out ‘a cellist’ playing ‘a cello’

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10. Resources to bring to the lesson:

  • Percussion (untuned) instruments – one for each child
  • A printed copy of the cello and bow (A3) – one for each pupil – card and glue to stick these out – colour and cut out
  • A printed copy of the violin-cello sheet for each pupil
  • Crayons
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11. Key vocabulary: 

Cello

Strings Family

Cello:

Strings Family:

12. Run through:

The lesson aims & objectives (found when you first click on Lesson 4)

The ‘lesson content’  tab, where you will find exercises for this lesson:

  • Ensure you can do all of the exercises.
  • Read through the ‘lesson content’ repeatedly before teaching it in order to be prepared.
  • Play the slideshow (open slideshow button on top corner of page in ‘lesson content’) that will be displayed during the class
  • Download and print the lesson activity sheets at the bottom of the page in ‘lesson content’ – practice explaining the activities as you play the slideshow (see point above)
  • Plan your own answers to the questions you will ask the children to prompt them and retain focus.

Theassessment & homework’ tasks for this lesson

The ‘background information’ tab, where teacher can find further information about the lesson, the story, and the music. 

 

 

 

Lesson 4: The Cello

Topic 4 explores the theme of Family through the second instrument within the Voyage To The Moon orchestra – the Cello. The cello is from the same ‘instrument family’ as the violin – the String Family – and so similarities and differences between these ‘family members’ are explored.
In Lesson 4 you will explore:

  • Similarities and differences between our family members, leading to the connection between different instruments within the same ‘family’. 
  • ‘Pitch‘, in relation to both the violin and cello.
  • A new part of the music and story, building listening, analytical and performance skills.
  • The role of the cello in the Voyage to the Moon music and story.
  • Verse 3 in the Voyage to the Moon music.

Click here to go to Preparation

Click here to go to Lesson Content

Click here to go to Assessment

 

King & Queen Ball room

King & Queen Ball room