Nursery Song Library

Scroll down the page to view the following songs:

  1. Conductor Of Our Band
  2. How Many Fingers Do You Have
  3. Make A Triangle There
  4. Mr. Composer, please!
  5. Music Adventure
  6. See Us In Space
  7. The Prince’s Song
  8. Time to Make A Beat
  9. Time to Make Loud Music
  10. Time to Make Soft Music
  11. Welcome to the Circle Time
  12. We See the Moon at Night *<NEW>*

TOP TIP 4 TEACHING: For the children to learn to sing the songs off-by-heart, repeat them at meal times, on walks, during play etc.

1. Conductor of Our Band

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:

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2. How Many Fingers Do You Have

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
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3. Make A Triangle There

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
[
Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 09.29.10

 

4. Mr. Composer, Please

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
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5. Music Adventure

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
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6. See Us In Space

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 11.00.36

 

7. The Prince’s Song

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
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8. Time to Make A Beat

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 11.17.09

 

9. Time to Make Loud Music

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
Screen Shot 2016-08-31 at 10.44.23

 

10. Time to Make Soft Music

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
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11. Welcome to Class

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
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12. We See the Moon at Night

 

Recording: Piano & Vocals:
 Recording: Piano Only:
 

Further Information & Tips 12

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

Part 1: Interactive Story

Structure

 This is the final lesson of the pack. It will consolidate all the information that has been learnt over the last 12 weeks. This will help solidify the musical theory that has been taught, and complete the literary adventure that the children have gone on with Prince Caprice and his friends.

This lesson varies slightly in structure compared to the previous lessons in the pack; with it split into two parts (The Interactive Story & Movement to Music) that will showcase all that the children have learnt throughout the term.

Musical Theme: All

In this lesson the group will recap on all that they have learnt over the  of the pack.

This lesson as a whole will help the children solidify the information that they have absorbed over the past 12 weeks and allows them to internalise the knowledge that they have gained about a variety of different classical instruments, roles and rules.

Story

Within the first part of the lesson the children will have the opportunity to interact with the entire animated story.

They will read it from beginning to end, reengaging with all the characters, poems and concepts that they have encountered.

This section of the lesson incorporates all the elements of the EYFS, however it main focus is literacy. Through the reading of the story, they children will have the chance to fill in the gaps, recreate scenes using their imagination and use the skills they have learnt to express their thoughts.

Props

In the consolidation topic the teacher should use the props from the past 12 lessons. These include:

  • Story pictures
  • Orchestra picture
  • Images of each instrument
  • Images of dynamics
  • Image of Conductor

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

This lesson focuses on solidifying the information that the children have learnt; not only about the instruments and music but also the story, characters that they have met and events that took place.

It is important to focus on the different themes that have been introduced throughout the past 12 lessons as these help the children’s development goal from the EYFS.

There are a number of ways a teacher can make the story interactive for the children. Three examples can be found in the preparation section on lesson 12, however, the teacher can also give the class the choice of how they would like the story presented.

Part 2: Movement to Music

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Songs/Rhymes:

Final Lesson

Throughout the lesson the children will recap on all the songs and poems that they have learnt throughout the term.

 

Responding to Music:

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative.

Movement to Music: 

  • The second part of this lesson consists of a movement to music exercise. This will be an opportunity for the class to hear the whole piece of music of Voyage to the Moon from start to finish.
  • Throughout this session the group will be able to incorporate all they have learnt about the different instruments, dynamics and components of the piece and the orchestra.
  • While listening to the music the children will create movement according to the mood and tone of the section they are listening to. The children will also come into interaction with the symbols that give instruction within music.
  • This section will be mostly focused on the Communication and Language, Physical and Expressive Arts and Design elements of the EYFS.

The Music

During this lesson the children will hear the full piece of music and recap on the different sections of it (verses and chorus).

Throughout the children will be given the opportunity to express themselves and recognise the different instruments and their solos.

Skill Development

Throughout the consolidation lesson the children will work on all the skills that they have developed throughout the past 12 lessons.

Going over all the themes will solidify the concepts that have been introduced to the children and will work on all the elements of the EYFS.

Further Information & Tips 11

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion: Body and Leadership

This circle time touches on the subject of the body and leadership.

The children will begin with a recap of the previous theme following onto a discussion about ourselves/bodies and leadership.
How can we use our bodies to instruct someone of what to do? (Hand gestures e.g. waving at them to come over).

The discussion will follow on to an explanation and introduction to the most important role within the orchestra. To solidify the children’s understanding of the role of the conductor and how he does his job, the adult should show a video clip of the conductor. Thereafter the children should be allowed to discuss what they saw in the clip.

Musical Theme: Conductor

The aim of lesson 11 is to introduce the role of the Conductor in an Orchestra. The Conductor is one of the most important people in an orchestra as he helps the musicians keep in time with the music. He also keeps musicians informed as to whether the music is loud or quiet.

He stands at the front of the orchestra on a raised stand, so that everyone can see him, and waves his conducting baton/stick to keep in time with the music – as learned in lesson 10, Voyage to the Moon is in three beats.
In Voyage to the Moon, he is introduced as Commodore the Conductorin the navy, a commodore leads the men and that is what the conductor does with his musicians.

The children are introduced to an all-together different, yet important, role within the orchestra – the conductor.

This role is different from the other instruments because it does not involve an instrument at all. Instead it is a leader of the orchestra using a ‘conducting stick’ (baton) to lead the group of musicians on a journey through the music.

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

 

Throughout this lesson the children will gain knowledge on their bodies and leadership.

This lesson is aimed at helping children develop a range of skills  e.g.:

  • Understand and develop their spatial awareness
  • Social skills
  • Communication and leadership skills.
  • Counting skills
  • Etc.

 

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Along with the group, recap on the previous circle time; discuss the role of the conductor and what he does.

While music is playing in the background introduce props such as:

  • The conducting baton
  • A picture of Commodore the Conductor
  • Story pictures
  • a podium/small step/a boxAllow the children to tell you what each prop is; helping them solidify the information that they had learnt previously.

Games

Voyage to the Moon lessons are created in order to engage the children in a fun and stimulating way. One way that we do this is through games. The children engage in a number of group games in order to develop skills in sharing, listening and communication and to further their social skills.

Within this lesson then children will take part in a game that allows them to name others to take a stand on the podium and pretend to be the conductor. This game is also aimed at increasing the children’s confidence. 

Rhymes and Instruments

The introduction and discussion of the conductor’s poem will further help the children internalize their understanding of the conductor’s role and actions.

Commodore the Conductor:

  • Commodore the conductor is my nameLeading others to keep in time’s my gameI hold my baton way up high

    Then count to three as my arms fly

    I start up high for all to see

    To make the shape I’m counting one, two, three!

Untuned Instruments

Through the use of untuned instruments and role-play the children will learn, not only, how to follow the music but also how to keep an eye out for different instructions.

  •  The adult being the ‘conductor’ and the children the orchestra

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through two different activities:

Movement to Music:

  • The lesson will then end with a final activity of movement to music where they will have the opportunity to pretend and practice being the conductor themselves using the knowledge that they have learnt of his role and motions.
  • During the lesson the children would have been exposed to the movements of the conductor and how he instruct. This is done through song and rhyme (‘The triangle song’ – found in Song Library).

Skill Development

The active lesson will continue touching on the mathematical and expressive arts and design elements of the EYFS as well as gross motor movements within the physical.

For the Story/Music

Story/Characters

The literary adventure continues as Prince Caprice and his friends finally reach the moon where Princess Fantasia awaits them. The Prince, Princess and all of their instrument friends meet and decide that they want to go on another adventure. However, they need someone to lead them – which is when we meet Commodore the Conductor who leads them into the rocket and onto a new adventure.

This lesson allows room for the imagination. Focusing on literacy – the children get an opportunity to imagine where the Prince, Princess and all their friends may go next.

The Music

The full piece of music will be hear throughout this entire lesson. The children will have the opportunity to show case what they have learnt previously by becoming the conductor, counting in 3s and really engaging in the notion of leadership.

Further Information & Tips 10

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion: Routine

Topic 10’s discussion focuses on the theme of routine. This allows the children to talk about what type of routine they follow.

This can be prompted by the teacher with images of different routines e.g.:

  1. waking up, brushing teach and getting dressed
  2. mealtime routines – breakfast, lunch, dinner
  3. You can also incorporate the nursery/school routine.

This discussion correlates to the music concept of rhythm.

Musical Theme: Rhythm

This is a lesson on rhythm and is designed to help improve concentration and coordination, as well as counting.

Firstly, we will look at ‘3 Beats’. Every piece of music has a time signature that helps musicians keep in time with the music and gives it a natural rhythm. In Voyage to the Moon the time signature is ¾ – this means that there are 3 beats in each bar.

In order to introduce the 3 beat rhythm to the class, we will look at the chorus/Prince’s song, as this is where the rhythm is easiest to follow.

The second part of the lesson introduces the Pause – the pause sign is a way to have the children further their concentration and understanding of beats and timing, as they must respond to the pause sign through various activities in the lesson.
 As you will see in the video (found in the preparation section), you are able to clap the beat 1-2-3 throughout the whole chorus (and rest of the music). 
This is a fun exercise aimed to engage the children with the basic background of the structure of the piece. The use of clapping and playing untuned instruments is encouraged in this lesson.

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

Activities within this lesson will build on relationships between the children as well as teaching them how to respect and listen to others. It will also work on the children’s abilities to follow instructions and get them more familiar with some of the signs within music.

During the reading of the story pages the children will come into contact with the notion language. By highlighting the fact that the Prince and Princess speak different languages, it gives the group the chance to talk about what languages each individual speaks. This could also be a good chance for children with EAL (english as an additional language) to show case their native tongue and maybe teach the group a few words!

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Recap on the previous circle time by introducing prompts e.g. the sheet with the beat beanies.

Allow the children to tell you what they think the signs means and to show the group, by creating a rhythm. The group will then go on to clap the 3 beat rhythm to the Prince’s song (the chorus).

The story book pages should also be shown in order to recap and reinforce literacy knowledge.

Sing-a-long:

 The Prince’s Song:

The children should have been exposed to this song throughout the pack and should be familiar with melody and lyrics. The reason that the children are continuously exposed to this section of the music is because it is the chorus of the piece and is also the easiest section for the children to hear the rhythm of the music.

The children will also be introduced to a new poem, which belongs to the beat beanies. This poem helps the children in internalise the notion that the rhythm of Voyage to the Moon is 3 beats.

Beat Beanies:

  • We are the beat beanies,
    yes that’s us,
    we count and tap and make no fuss.
    There is one tap for each of these,
    1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, if you please! 

Games

The children throughout the lesson will be involved in a number of games. These games are aimed at helping the children develop their social skills as well as their spatial awareness, physical and counting skills.

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through two different activities:

Movement to Music:

  • Within the lessons the children are given the chance to move to the music, working on their physical development as well as other areas of the EYFS.
  • In lesson 10 the children create actions to the full piece of music in 3s e.g.:
  1. hop, skip, jump
  2. clap, stamp, wiggle
  3. tiptoe, march, run etc.

This reflects the lesson content and the musical concept that they would have learnt.

Skill Development

Learning as a group can inspire confidence and demonstrate individual development, especially when the exercise is repeated. Learning through song and actions help the children to concentrate and tests them on their listening and communication skills.

For the Story/Music

Story/Characters

Within the animated story the children will be introduced to the 3 Beat Beanies – Betty, Bobby and Baz.

These 3 beats appear when the Prince and his friends land on the moon and meet Princess Fantasia for the first time. The reason that they appear is because the Prince and Princess speak different languages however both know how to play music, which means they have a language in common; it is the way they communicate.

The Music

Throughout the lesson the children will be exposed to the full piece of music, listening to the different sections and working on the 3 beat rhythm.

Although they will be exposed to the entire piece they will mostly be listening to the chorus as you can hear the rhythm clearly.

Untuned Instruments will be used in this lesson in various activities. Once the children have understood the concept of creating a rhythm and 3 beats, they should be given the opportunity to create their own rhythm. They have the chance to showcase the rhythm that they have created in front of the group going round in a circle. These activities work on the children’s creativity and imagination, as well as listening and confidence.

Further Information & Tips 9

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion: Expression

This circle time focuses on the third sign within dynamics – the Crescendo.

Through discussion, the group will focus on the theme of expression – how we express ourselves in different situations and how animals express themselves.

An explanation of the relationship between expression and music will help the children understand how they themselves can express themselves through music, as well as understanding what kind of story different pieces of music tell.

Musical Theme: Crescendo

In this lesson the children will be introduced to the musical term – Crescendo. In music, a crescendo means getting gradually louder.

The children, throughout this lesson, will learn how to respond to a crescendo sign.
The teacher holds up a picture of a big crescendo and moves a finger across it, starting at the smallest point (or tip of the triangle) and slowly moving towards the widest side of the crescendo.

  • As this is happening, the children can clap, speak the word ‘louder’ or use untuned instruments, by starting quietly and creating an increase in volume.

Having to watch the teacher and play at the same time will help the children to build on their concentration skills and will help them to develop relationships between images and their meanings.

The group will be introduced to the character ‘Crescendo Croc’. This will allow them to familiarise themselves with the musical sign; Crescendo.

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

At this level of learning, it is best to explain the concepts and then to ask simple questions with answers prompted by picture recognition. This will encourage children to verbalise what they ‘see’, and draw their own connections between the pictures and life around them.

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Throughout this lesson the children will learn about the Crescendo and its meaning in music.

During the lesson you will be using a number of props which will help develop the children’s skills in a number of areas of learning.

  1. Story book pictures which correlate to the sections in which a crescendo can be heard, should be used in order to emphasise its meaning e.g. when the rocket is flying through space, nearing the moon for landing.
  2. Untuned instruments are a fantastic prop which engage the children both individually and as a group in order to solidify what they are learning. Throughout the lesson the children will use untuned instruments to create a crescendo; both collectively and individually, therefore encouraging them to work together.

Songs and Rhymes:

In the previous lesson the children would have practiced the different volumes that musicians encounter when playing music. 

 forte = LOUD and piano = soft.

They will do this by responding to signs, therefore also helping them with letter + shape recognition and following instructions.

Dynamic’s Poems:

Throughout the lesson the children will be introduced to the character: Crescendo Croc. Its interaction with the children comes along with a poem in order to help solidify the children’s understanding of its  role within music.

Remember: when reading the poem start off quietly and gradually get louder towards the end. 

Crescendo Croc: 

  • “I’m Crescendo Croc and very keenTo show you all just what I meanFor at the start my teeth softly tap,Getting gradually louder with a great big snap!”

(The video in the Overview and Preparation section demonstrates the words and actions that can be taught to the class. The actions will help to improve memory and co-ordination.)

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through two different activities:

Movement to Music:

  • At the end of the lesson the teacher will play different sections of the music and the children will be asked to perform actions relating to the mood and speed of each section played. This will help to develop their spatial awareness and explore the range of physical activities that can be used to act out various ideas.
  • The children will be given the chance to each suggest an action that the class will then have to do. This encourages choice, confidence and social development.

Skill Development

This lesson mainly concentrates on the areas: Expressive Arts and Design, Mathematics and Literacy.

For the Story/Music

Story/Character

 The group will be introduced to the character ‘Crescendo Croc’. This will allow them to familiarise themselves with the musical sign; Crescendo.

In the story crescendo croc appears when Princess Fantasia sees the rocket approaching the moon. Her excitement overwhelms her and Crescendo Croc appears to emphasise the excitement.

The Music

Throughout this lesson the children will be focusing on the term Crescendo and its meaning within music. They will be listening to sections of the music which are marked with a crescendo – they are:

  • End of verse 2
  • End of verse 3
  • During the final chorus

Once they get familiar with the term, the children will use untuned instruments in order to create a crescendo together. They will do this both with and without the music.

Further Information & Tips 8

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion: Rules

This circle time focuses on the theme of rules and how we follow them. This theme correlates to music through the notion of different rules that are written within the music that musicians have to follow when playing instruments.

It begins with a discussion about everyday rules. What are they? Why do we follow them? Etc.

The aim is to encourage the children to get creative, show their understanding and express their thoughts.

Musical Theme: Dynamics

The discussion will be followed by an explanation that just as we are expected to follow certain rules, so are musicians.

Within this circle time the children will learn about two signs within music, Piano (Italian for quiet/soft) and Forte (Italian for loud).

  • Forte or f (pronounced for-tay) = loud
  • Piano or p (pronounced p-yar-no) = quiet/soft

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

As well as building on concentrating and listening skills, this lesson will help children to become more confident through its’ individual and group exercises.

Both the forte/piano poems should be read in a loud/soft voice to reinforce the definition.

There are opportunities for the children to create loud and soft noises, including saying ‘forte’ loudly and ‘piano’ softly, using untuned instruments, clapping their hands and stamping their feet.
This lesson will touch on various areas of the EYFS including: Expressive Arts and Design, Physical and Communication and Language.

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Recap on the previous circle time by introducing prompts e.g. the sheet with the Piano/Forte sign.

Allow the children to tell you what they think the signs mean and to show the group. The group will then go on to sing the Prince’s song in both piano (soft) and Forte (loud).

Once they have done so, it is time to meet the characters of our story Fredrick Forte and Penelope Piano.
These characters are introduced through each of their poems, which should be said in the different volumes of voice. The teacher should have the ‘f’ and ‘p‘ signs printed out and ready to show the class. This will help them recognise the signs for the different volumes and in turn respond to them.

Songs/Rhymes:

Familiar Song: ‘The Prince’s Song’:

The chorus tune from the music should have, by now, become   familiar.  The song helps the children make a connection to the prince and to the story itself.

The children will practice the different volumes by singing the Prince’s song in either forte or piano. They will do this by responding to signs, therefore also helping them with letter recognition and following instructions.

Dynamic’s Poems:

Throughout the lesson the children will be introduced to the characters: Fredrick Forte and Penelope Piano. Their interaction to the children comes along with poems in order to help solidify the children’s understanding of each of their roles within music.

Remember: each poem should be read in the volume of the character e.g. forte = LOUD and piano = soft.

Fredrick Forte: 

  • I’m Fredrick Forte – when you see me
    You’ll play so loud – the ‘F’ that’s me
    Yes ‘F’ means loud in music, so
    When you see this its loud, you know.

Penelope Piano: 

  • I’m Penelope Piano music sign
    When you see me its playing softly time
    The ‘P’ is just the way to know
    Playing soft’s the way to go

(The video in the Overview and Preparation section demonstrates the words and actions that can be taught to the class. The actions will help to improve memory and co-ordination.)

Games

After the children have solidified their understanding of the concept the group will move on to playing the dynamics game which involves the entire group.

This game will not only enhance the children’s understanding but also help develop their personal relationships, as well as turn taking.

Responding to Music:

One of the main parts of the active lesson is for the children to have a musical experience. Through the exploration of untuned musical instruments they can get a feel of what the instruments sound like and how they are played.

Movement to music:

  • Through the active lesson the children should also get a chance to move around to music; which should allow them to explore a variety of different movements. Therefore when playing the music in forte or piano, the adult should encourage the group to explore various movements e.g. crawling, marching and jumping.

Skill Development

Further discussion about what sounds we can make with our voices that are loud and soft should take place, with the introduction of sections of Voyage to the Moon that are Piano and Forte.

Following the discussion, there should be a choice of activity. Choice allows the children to express themselves and therefore there should be a choice of not only materials but also utensils for them to use.

For the Story/Music

Story/Characters

Once the game has ended (every child having a turn) the group should recap on the previous events in our story.

The new characters that are introduced are Fredrick Forte and Penelope Piano. In music piano and forte are words used to describe sound levels (loud and soft), therefore Fredrick and Penelope are introduced as best friends.

They appear in our story when the Prince and all of his instrument friends are ready to launch the rocket.

Penelope Piano appears to remind the instruments to play they music softly in order to launch the rocket. Fredrick Forte appears shortly after for the actual launch of the rocket. He reminds the instruments to play their music loudly when the rocket is launching.

This will allow the children to experience the rocket blasting off into space.

The Music

The children will be exposed to the full piece of music throughout the entire of the lesson. They will be listening to different sections of the music which are both played loudly and softly.

Further Information & Tips 7

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion

In this lesson the group will recap on all that they have learnt over the first part of the pack.

This lesson as a whole will help the children solidify the information that they have absorbed over the past 6 weeks and allows them to internalise the knowledge that they have gained about a variety of different classical instruments.

Musical Theme: Composer/All Instruments

This lesson focuses on all the instruments learnt so far. The children will recap on:

  • The Composer – Jaques Offenbach
  • Each instrument 
  • Its features
  • How they are held
  • The pitch and tone of the instrument’s music

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

This lesson focuses on solidifying the information that the children have learnt; not only about the instruments and music but also the story, characters that they have met and events that took place.

It is important to focus on the different themes that have been introduced throughout the past 6 lessons as these help the children’s development goal from the EYFS.

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

In the consolidation topic the teacher should use the props from the past 6 lessons. These include:

  • Story pictures
  • Orchestra picture
  • Images of each instrument

Songs/Rhymes:

The Prince’s Song:

The chorus tune from the music is a song that is sung by the prince. The children should sing the Prince’s song as it is a familiar song that they would have sung in most lessons.

The video in the Overview and Preparation section demonstrates the words and actions that can be taught to the class. The actions will help to improve memory and co-ordination.

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through two different activities:

Movement to Music: 

  • At the end of the lesson the teacher will play different sections of the music and the children will be asked to perform actions relating to the different instruments that are played. Through actions the children will have the opportunity to show the features of the instruments.
  • Through the repetition of the movement to music section the children will recap on the different pitches of the instruments as well as the tone of the music.

Skill Development

Throughout the consolidation lesson the children will work on all the skills that they have developed throughout the past 6 lessons.

Going over all the themes will solidify the concepts that have been introduced to the children and will work on all the elements of the EYFS.

For the Story/Music

All Characters

 Throughout the lesson the children will be recapping all of the characters that they have met throughout the pack so far.

This is done through the reading of the story pages from previous lessons.

The Music

During this lesson the children will hear the full piece of music and recap on the different sections of it (verses and chorus).

Throughout the children will be given the opportunity to express themselves and recognise the different instruments and their solos.

Further Information & Tips 6

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion: Listening to others

This circle time concentrates on the theme of listening to others. It emphasises the importance of listening to others and helps the children to develop a sense of control.

  • At the beginning the group should recap on all the instruments that hey have learnt about and the previous theme – shapes.
  • Once the children have shown their understanding of the shapes and instruments, the adult will introduce a new discussion about listening.
  • This discussion can be done through a fun game about colour.
    Each child says their favourite colour and the group repeats it.
  • This will show the importance of listening to others as well as show the children’s levels of control and patience.
  • This notion correlates to the orchestra and how there are some instruments that play louder than others and therefore they are given the opportunity to play by themselves, so they can all be heard.

Musical Theme: the Flute

The Flute is part of the Woodwind family.

Instruments, which are part of the Woodwind family, are generally made up of a combination of 2 materials (Wood and Metal) and are played by blowing through a mouthpiece. The Flute falls into the category of instruments which are made up of only metal.

In keeping with the family theme, Flora the Flute is presented as Olive the Oboe‘s sister as they come from the same instrument family.

The flute’s sound is gentle, calming and high-pitched. This makes it harder to hear the sound when it plays with other instruments. In the Voyage to the Moon music the flute is given a solo in order for it to be heard.

Comparison with the Oboe

The flute, like the oboe, is part of the woodwind family and is played by blowing through a mouthpiece.

Although they share similarity in their shape and the way they are played (with all 10 fingers); the Flute and Oboe have slight differences which are both physical and can be heard.

  • Material –  even though they are both part of the woodwind family, the Oboe and Flute are made of different materials. The Oboe is made of wood and metal (keys); however, the Flute is generally made with silver-plated brass (giving it a silver colour).
  • Technique – although both the Oboe and Flute are played by blowing air into them, they differ in the technique that is used to play them. The Flute’s music is more claiming and is played by blowing over a metal mouth piece; whereas, the Oboe is played by blowing into a reed which creates vibrations.
  • Position of which held – Finally, the Flute is played horizontally (to the side) whereas, the Oboe is played vertically (to the front).

We have provided an activity sheet that can be rolled up to create the flute and the video preparation demonstrates how to hold and play this instrument.

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

This is an opportunity for adults to work on the notion of listening to others and solidify the concept with the younger children within the group.

  • Explain to the children that the Flute’s sound is not as loud as any of the other instruments which is why we have to be very quiet in order to hear it.

This circle time also touches on the developmental area of imaginative play. As the children listen to the music, allow them to pretend to be the musician and play the instruments that are playing the music.

As an ending point to the circle time the adult should introduce music played by the new instrument from the Voyage To The Moon orchestra – Flora the Flute.
Remind the children to be quiet while they are listening to the flute’s music in order to hear it. 

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Once the children have sung it the Adventure Song, its time to recap on the previous circle time about listening to others.

This is a chance for the children to explore what the different instruments look like by exploring a picture of the orchestra. Allow them to look over the picture and voice what instruments they see, whether they look similar or different etc.

  • [This is an important consolidation point as the flute is the final instrument that the children will be learning about before going on to learning about the dynamics that are incorporated into classical music.]

Having the story pictures as visual prompts helps the children to remember what has happened in the story and what will happen next. It also allows the children to remember the different characters that they have met so far.

Having untuned instruments next to you aids you in reminding the children about the difference in pitch using physical props (i.e. drum for low-pitch and bell for high-pitch).

To make the most of these props; the adult can leave them out to view prior to the lesson, so that ideas surrounding them have time to resonate with the children.

Songs/Rhymes:

As the Flute has distinct features and a distinct sound, the children learn a poem to help them understand its features. The poem should be said in a high-pitched voice and has actions that go along with it:

I am Flora the fluttering Flute 

When you play me, I go ‘toot toot’

So hold me out and to the side

and listen to my flute sounds glide!

  •  Actions to the poem can be found in the video provided under the subsection ‘Resources’ in Lesson 6 – Flute.

Once the poem has been said aloud, the children have a chance to identify the features of the Flute.

  • Allow them time to express their thoughts as to the appearance, sound etc.

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Throughout the lesson the children will be introduced to the music that is played by the flute in the final chorus and verse. The flute’s music is a feature in the final verse and can heard because the other instruments are quiet.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through:

Movement to Music:

  • The music will be played from the beginning till the end of the piece.
  • The children will be following directions which will be given by the teacher in order to create different movements in order to respond to the different events that occur in the music/story.
    (these movements can be found in the lesson content of Active Lesson in Topic 6. Alternatively the teacher can make up their own movements or even allow the children to create the movements as they hear the piece.)
  • This helps the children internalise the different events that happen throughout. 

Skill Development

 This lesson focuses on areas such as PhysicalExpressive Arts, Literacy and Personal, Social and Emotional; however with a main focus on Listening in Communication and Language.  within the EYFS.

For the Story/Music

Flora the Flute

Flora Flute is the 5th character to be introduced into the animated story of Voyage to the Moon.

Flora Flute is a character that is introduced when the Prince and his friends have finished building the rocket and would like to get it ready for launch. They call Flora to help because teaches the instruments to work as a team and listen to each other.

[As Flora the Flute and Olive the Oboe come from the same instrument family they are presented as sisters in the story.]

The Music

The music in topic 6 focuses on the music from the beginning till the end of the piece where the flute is featured.

Approaching the end of the lesson allows the group to end with a game. The musical game is played in order to cement the notion of pitch and the differences between the instruments as well as the different events that take place throughout the story/music.

The children learn how to follow instructions and concentrate more on their physical development through movement to music. They develop their spacial awareness and listening skills.

Further Information & Tips 5

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Discussion: Shape and Size

This circle time incorporates all the instruments that the children have learnt about until now.

  • The discussion should be based on the notion of shape and size.
  • Look at the differences between the instruments and their similarities.

You, as the adult, can help the children by asking them questions such as ‘is the Oboe bigger or smaller than the French Horn?’

Musical Theme: the Oboe

The Oboe is part of the Woodwind family.

Instruments, which are part of the Woodwind family, are generally made up of a combination of 2 materials (Wood and Metal) and are played by blowing through a mouthpiece.

In keeping with the family theme we say that Olive the Oboe is cousins with Freddy the French Horn (although they are from different instrument families).

Comparison with the French Horn

Within the orchestra there are many instrument families. There are many similarities and differences between all instruments in all families.

The Oboe and the French horn belong to different families (Woodwind/Brass) and have similarities and differences which make them relatable.

There are 4 main similarities/differences between the Oboe and French horn:

  1. Material – the main difference between the two is what they are made of (the oboe being made of wood and metal whereas the French horn is made of only metal/brass).
  2. Technique – although there are similarities in the way that the instruments are played, as both use air to create sound, they differ from one and other. The French horn requires a players lips to vibrate in order to create sound. Whereas, the oboe needs a reed which is placed on  the mouthpiece in order to help create vibrations.
    (the woodwind instruments also generally need less air blown through them as they are smaller than the brass).
  3. Volume – the volume of an instrument is controlled by  the vibrations created by the air that is blown into the mouthpiece. A woodwind instruments’ volume, generally, cannot be controlled because the player does not change the levels of vibration in the lips when they play, unlike the French horn.
  4. Keys vs. Valves – these are both a similarity and difference between the two instruments. The oboe has metal keys on it whereas the french horn has valves. They both help control the flow of the are within the instrument in order to control pitch and tone.

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

This is an opportunity for adults to work on simple shapes and solidify the concept with the younger children within the group.

  • Explain to the children that the instruments that are from the same family are generally made up from the same shapes (e.g. Violin and Cello).

This circle time also touches on the developmental area of imaginative play. As the children listen to the music, allow them to pretend to be the musician and play the instruments that are playing the music. As an ending point to the circle time the adult should introduce music played by the new instrument from the Voyage To The Moon orchestra – Olive the Oboe.

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Once the children have sung it the Adventure Song, its time to recap on the previous circle time about shapes and size.

This is a chance for the children to explore what the different instruments look like by exploring a picture of the orchestra. Allow them to look over the picture and voice what instruments they see, whether they look similar or different etc.

Having the story pictures as visual prompts helps the children to remember what has happened in the story and what will happen next. It also allows the children to remember the different characters that they have met so far.

Having untuned instruments next to you aids you in reminding the children about the difference in pitch using physical props (i.e. drum for low-pitch and bell for high-pitch).

To make the most of these props; the adult can leave them out to view prior to the lesson, so that ideas surrounding them have time to resonate with the children.

Songs/Rhymes:

As the Oboe has distinct features and a distinct sound, the children learn a poem to help them understand its features. The poem should be said in a high-pitched voice and has actions that go along with it:

I am Olive the Oboe thin and lean

I use 10 fingers as a team

Purse your lips around the reed

To make clear sounds with grace and speed!

  •  Actions to the poem can be found in the video provided under the subsection ‘Resources’ in Lesson 5 – Oboe.

Once the poem has been said aloud, the children have a chance to identify the features of the Oboe.

  • Allow them time to express their thoughts as to the appearance, sound etc.

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through:

Movement to Music:

  • The music will be played from the beginning till the end of verse 3.
  • The children will be following instructions which will be given by the teacher in order to create different movements according to the difference in mood and pitch throughout the piece.
    (these movements can be found in the lesson content of Active Lesson in Topic 5)
  • This helps the children internalise the differences in pitch.

Skill Development

 This lesson focuses on areas such as PhysicalCommunication and LanguageExpressive Arts; however with a main focus on Mathematics.  within the EYFS.

For the Story/Music

Olive the Oboe

Olive the Oboe is the 4th character to be introduced into the animated story of Voyage to the Moon.

Olive the Oboe is a character that is introduced when the Prince and his friends are building the rocket. The rocket that they use to get to the moon is made up of many different shapes and colours, which Olive is an expert at. This is the reason that they call her to come and help finish building the rocket.

The Music

The music in topic 5 focuses on the music from the beginning till the end of the third verse where the oboe is featured.

Approaching the end of the lesson allows the group to end with a game. The musical game is played in order to cement the notion of pitch and the differences between the instruments. The children learn how to follow instructions and concentrate more on their physical development through movement to music.

Further Information & Tips 4

There are 3 tables in this section:

  1. For the Circle Time
  2. For the Active Lesson
  3. For the Story/Music (where you can find information about characters, the composer, etc.)

For the Circle Time

Background information: French Horn

The French horn is part of the Brass Family. Instruments within this family are made of brass (metal). The instrument was modelled on early hunting horns.

It is handheld, and sound is created by blowing through a mouthpiece. The French horn has a mellow, timbre or sound. It has a medium-pitch.

The French horn

As well as playing with the whole orchestra, the French horn plays a solo while the prince sings his song.
Its music is expressive and matches the dreamy tone of the prince’s song.

Discussion: Feelings and Emotions

Throughout the circle time the group will recap and continue to learn about the instruments that are included in the Voyage To The Moon orchestra.

The theme of feelings and emotions will be discussed and explored through the introduction of French Horn .

The discussion of feelings and emotions allows the children to understand and communicate their thoughts and ideas.

  • This helps express themselves and show their thoughts about emotions and what they are.
  • It provides insight into how each child understands the world around them, using practical activities to develop social skills and group interaction.

Musical Concept: Tone/Mood

The rest of the circle time focuses on identifying emotions heard in the music.

The children will listen to sections played by the violin, cello and French horn. They will then use their knowledge of different emotions to express what they believe each instrument is trying to convey.

In the way that a scene is set and creates the general feeling of the chapter in a book, instruments play with expression to create the tone of the music and story.

Teaching Tips for Skill Development

Recapping on the information taught in the previous lesson will help the children solidify what they learnt and use the information within this circle time.

 

For the Active Lesson

Music Adventure Song:

The lesson begins with ‘the adventure song’, which will be repeated at the start of every lesson. This song will remind the children of the connection with the previous circle time.  

Props:

Once the children have sung it the Adventure Song, its time to recap on the previous circle time about feelings and emotions.

This is a chance for the children to explore what the different instruments look like by exploring a picture of the orchestra. Allow them to look over the picture and voice what instruments they see, whether they look similar or different etc.

  • You can ask the children questions in order to help trigger their memory of the different instruments e.g. which instrument is made of brass? 

Having untuned instruments next to you aids you in reminding the children about the difference in pitch using physical props (i.e. drum for low-pitch and bell for high-pitch).

  • Visual props are extremely useful in helping children internalise what they are learning. Have pictures of the story pictures and the instruments help with solidifying what the children have learnt and what they will learn.

Songs/Rhymes:

The French horn has distinct features, distinct sound and is held in a specific way.

The children learn a poem to help them understand its features. The poem should be said in a mellow tone and has actions that go along with it:

I am Freddy the French horn big and round

You blow me to make my special sound

I’ve three gold buttons that can be pressed

To make brass sounds that I like best!

  •  Actions to the poem can be found in the video provided under the subsection ‘Resources’ in Lesson 4 – French Horn.

Once the poem has been said aloud, the children have a chance to identify the different features of the French Horn.

  • Allow them time to express their thoughts as to the appearance, sound etc.

Responding to Music:

Responding to the music is an important element of this Active Lesson.

Music is imaginative and we want the children to be imaginative. This is achieved through:

Movement to Music:

  • The music from the beginning until the end of the verse 2 will be played.
  • The children will be creating movements according to the mood of the music, storyline and the instruments that they have learnt about.
    This will help children gain an understanding of spacial awareness and listening for instructions. 
  • The children will also get an opportunity to sing the ‘prince’s song’ which is sung to the chorus of the music.
    Recapping on the ‘prince’s song’ helps the children differentiate between the chorus and the verses. 

Skill Development

 This lesson mainly focuses on areas such as Personal, social and emotionsCommunication and Language, Physical, Expressive Arts and Literacy within the EYFS.

For the Story/Music

 Freddy the French Horn

Once they have identified the instruments, it is time to introduce Freddy the French Horn.

Meeting Freddy the French Horn introduces a new character into our animated story and allows us to continue our musical adventure with the prince.

Freddy the French Horn is introduced as the third character that the children will meet on their journey with the Prince. Freddy is a special friend of the Prince. Freddy helps make the Prince feel brave about travelling to the moon, by playing his special song.

The Music

Within topic 4, both in the circle time and active lesson, the children will focus on the chorus – ‘The Prince’s Song’. This is a section of the music that is repeated throughout the piece. This is a song that will be sung by the children throughout the pack.

Approaching the end of the lesson allows the group to end with a game. The musical game is played in order to cement the children’s understanding of the music, story and the instruments.

Thereafter, each child will be creating movements to the music. The music will be played from the beginning till the end of verse 2. This helps the children showcase what they have learnt and what they remember. It allows them to journey through the story to the music that accompanies the prince throughout.